Lazy Meh

Me blog where I post Awesome Stuff

gavsryan:

The finest moments of Team Love N’ Stuff aka Achievement Hunter’s Ryan Haywood and Gavin Free.

made by AHhaywood

(Source: youtube.com, via fuckyeahroosterteethproductions)

ask-ickle-mod:

beatonna:

La Commune (Paris, 1871) Another Peter Watkins for you.  I had to turn the english captions on, FYI.  From Rotten Tomatoes:

Noted filmmaker and media critic Peter Watkins directs this mammoth six-hour-long look at the legendary Paris Commune of 1871. Following the humiliating defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian War, the reign of Napoleon III collapsed in the resulting public foment. While a new regime headed under the Government of National Defense tried to shore up power, a band of commoners took the reigns of power for themselves and created the Paris Commune, a government defiantly separate from the state operating under a sort of proto-Marxist ethos. Inevitably, the Commune was brutally suppressed by French troops. Watkins’ treatment of the event juxtaposes the present with the past — modern day CNN-style reporting with historical fact. 

Some helpful context for Ickle in the western au! In general though, check it out—it’s really quite fascinating!

sagesins:

tuutuuruu:

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A mouth-watering fuck-ton of hand references.

[From various sources]

FOR ALL THE ARTISTS OUT THERE, I GIVE YOU…HANDS

tuutuuruu mentioned this post on my wip sketch, thank you very much this should definitely help because i seriously cannot draw hands. everything else, fine, hands, must look at refs for at all times.

(via smokeskree)

http://sunshinederp.tumblr.com/post/94796741452/nidoranduran-lyraeon-patrickat-lyraeon

nidoranduran:

lyraeon:

patrickat:

lyraeon:

Upon second viewing, I have definitely concluded that Guardians of the Galaxy is even better when you imagine it as a tabletop campaign with an increasingly frustrated DM who’s sick of being interrupted.

GM: “Roll 2d10.”
Peter:…

zedrin-maybe:

digitalbrushes:

Sam Nielson Photoshop Brushes

Download Here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/z64uuyoaacz20xz/Sam%27s%20Tool%20Presets.tpl

Source Here: http://artsammich.blogspot.com/2013/03/photoshop-brushes_11.html

Okay a window has been opnened for me here.

These brushes are super nice, first off, but I HAD NO IDEA YOU COULD WORK TOOL PRESETS THIS WAY.

I thought the presets ended at the brush settings but it turns out you can control every aspect of the tool, such as opacity, flow, etc.

Oh my god how did I not realize this earlier. This is going to speed up my workflow so much when shifting between shading, lineart, coloring, etc.

Plus these brushes man. Holy shit. I feel like a kid in a candy shop.

donkos:

gekkan shoujo nozaki-kun is a treasure,

(via fauxsquared)

king-satan-senpai:

lifehackable:

Stretches that improve different aspects of your body.

i hate lower pain pain. bless this.

(via micthemicrophone)

theperfectionistdiaries:

Good Notetaking
This is the system I’ve used since my sophomore year of high school for notes and its worked consistently, all the way through to my senior year of college. I hope it helps!
I generally use three different color pens in bright shades. You want your notes to be something you enjoy looking at. One color is for headings and important, must remember facts (pink). One color is for key words and theories (green) and one is for definitions (purple).
If I’m given a diagram during a lecture, I do my best to copy it down. Then I try to describe whats going on in my own words. Having a mental image of some important process has saved my but on an exam multiple times!
I also draw little example pictures inline with the text of my notes as additional memory devices.
If the professor makes the class slides available before the lecture, I’ll print them and write general summaries of the material in my notes ahead of time. That will save you from rushing in lecture and give you more time to ask questions about the things you don’t understand.
Generally, my notes don’t come out as neat as they are here. Most of the time, I end up copying them over so they’re easier to read and study from. Plus you get the added bonus of extra revision!
Good luck and happy studying! Xx

theperfectionistdiaries:

Good Notetaking

This is the system I’ve used since my sophomore year of high school for notes and its worked consistently, all the way through to my senior year of college. I hope it helps!

  • I generally use three different color pens in bright shades. You want your notes to be something you enjoy looking at. One color is for headings and important, must remember facts (pink). One color is for key words and theories (green) and one is for definitions (purple).
  • If I’m given a diagram during a lecture, I do my best to copy it down. Then I try to describe whats going on in my own words. Having a mental image of some important process has saved my but on an exam multiple times!
  • I also draw little example pictures inline with the text of my notes as additional memory devices.
  • If the professor makes the class slides available before the lecture, I’ll print them and write general summaries of the material in my notes ahead of time. That will save you from rushing in lecture and give you more time to ask questions about the things you don’t understand.

Generally, my notes don’t come out as neat as they are here. Most of the time, I end up copying them over so they’re easier to read and study from. Plus you get the added bonus of extra revision!

Good luck and happy studying! Xx

(Source: prep-progress-perfection, via laceymod)

anatomicalart:

Quickest way to improvement? Practice. It’s a simple bit of advice that rings with absolute truth. Articles, tips, mentors, and study will never get you as far as rolling up your sleeves and getting down to work, be it animation or any other skill. Today we’ve compiled a list of exercises, like animation push-ups, that will get your art skills buff and toned.
Maybe you still need convinced of how important the “Art of Doing” is? Look no further than the early days of animation, especially at the Disney studio. Here were a group of animators (before being an animator was even a thing) who HAD no books to read, or websites to visit, or even experienced animators to ask. They learned via the age old art of hands-on training, experimenting and discovering as they went. And some would argue they created some of the greatest animation to ever be seen. Masterpieces like the dwarfs dancing in Snow White or the terror of the Monstro scene in Pinocchio. So be like them! Get out there and do animation!

Some of these exercises you may have done or seen before; some maybe not. Consider doing each of them, even if you did once previously, because returning to an old exercise to see how much you’ve progressed is a very valuable experience.
Level 1 Exercises
(Do not discount their simplicity! Here you have the principals of animation, which all other animation is built on. They are worth your time and effort.)
Ball Bouncing in place, no decay (loop)
Ball Bouncing across the screen
Brick falling from a shelf onto the ground
Simple character head turn
Character head turn with anticipation
Character blinking
Character thinking [tougher than it sounds!]
Flour Sack waving (loop)
Flour Sack jumping
Flour Sack falling (loop or hitting the ground)
Flour Sack kicking a ball
Level 2 Exercises
Change in Character emotion (happy to sad, sad to angry, etc.)
Character jumping over a gap
Standing up (from a chair)
Walk Cycle [oldie but goodie!]
Character on a pogo stick (loop)
Laughing
Sneezing
Reaching for an object on a shelf overhead
Quick motion smear/blur
Taking a deep breath [also tougher than it sounds!]
A tree falling
Character being hit by something simple (ball, brick, book)
Run Cycle
Level 3 Exercises
Close up of open hand closing into fist
Close up of hand picking up a small object
Character lifting a heavy object (with purpose!)
Overlapping action (puffy hair, floppy ears, tail)
Character painting
Hammering a nail
Stirring a soup pot and tasting from a spoon
Character blowing up a balloon
Character juggling (loop)
Scared character peering around a corner
Zipping up a jacket
Licking and sealing an envelope
Standing up (from the ground)
Pressing an elevator button and waiting for it
Starting to say something but unsure of how
Level 4 Exercises
Character eating a cupcake
Object falling into a body of water
Two characters playing tug-of-war
Character dealing a deck of cards out
The full process of brushing one’s teeth
A single piece of paper dropping through the air
Run across screen with change in direction
Sleeping character startled by alarm then returning to sleepy state
Opening a cupboard and removing something inside
Putting on a pair of pants
Opening the “world’s best gift” and reacting
Any of the above exercises using a very heavy character/object next to a very light character/object. Enhance the differences the weight change makes!
Things to keep in mind:
Reading these exercises will do as much for you as reading about push-ups would do for your physical muscles: NOTHING. If you want the benefit, you must animate them. Take a deep breath and just do it.
Do not forget the famous words of Ollie Johnston: “You’re not supposed to animate drawings [3D models]. You’re supposed to animate feelings.” If a character isn’t thinking, they aren’t alive, and the animation has failed.
Keep it simple! There is no reason to over complicate any of these exercises. Going back to push-ups, would push-ups be harder if while doing them you also recited the Gettysburg Address? Yes. Would they be any more beneficial? No. Keep things nice and simple and clear.
Do your best. There is no reason to do these exercises poorly. Give it your all. You don’t have to show anyone, these are for you. You owe it to yourself to try your very best. Something not quite right? Take the time to fix it.
As always, have fun. Push ups are not fun. Animation is supposed to be. Be joyful in your work!
Have any questions about the exercises above? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer them the best we can! Someone else may be wondering the exact same thing, so you’ll help them too. Likewise if someone is looking for possible exercises, why not share a link to these and give them a hand?

Article featured on AnimatorIsland.com [Source]Article composed by J.K. RIKIMARCH 18, 2013Follow @AnimatorIsland on Twitter for more updates tips and tricks.

anatomicalart:

Quickest way to improvement? Practice. It’s a simple bit of advice that rings with absolute truth. Articles, tips, mentors, and study will never get you as far as rolling up your sleeves and getting down to work, be it animation or any other skill. Today we’ve compiled a list of exercises, like animation push-ups, that will get your art skills buff and toned.

Maybe you still need convinced of how important the “Art of Doing” is? Look no further than the early days of animation, especially at the Disney studio. Here were a group of animators (before being an animator was even a thing) who HAD no books to read, or websites to visit, or even experienced animators to ask. They learned via the age old art of hands-on training, experimenting and discovering as they went. And some would argue they created some of the greatest animation to ever be seen. Masterpieces like the dwarfs dancing in Snow White or the terror of the Monstro scene in Pinocchio. So be like them! Get out there and do animation!

image

Some of these exercises you may have done or seen before; some maybe not. Consider doing each of them, even if you did once previously, because returning to an old exercise to see how much you’ve progressed is a very valuable experience.

Level 1 Exercises

(Do not discount their simplicity! Here you have the principals of animation, which all other animation is built on. They are worth your time and effort.)

  1. Ball Bouncing in place, no decay (loop)
  2. Ball Bouncing across the screen
  3. Brick falling from a shelf onto the ground
  4. Simple character head turn
  5. Character head turn with anticipation
  6. Character blinking
  7. Character thinking [tougher than it sounds!]
  8. Flour Sack waving (loop)
  9. Flour Sack jumping
  10. Flour Sack falling (loop or hitting the ground)
  11. Flour Sack kicking a ball
Level 2 Exercises
  1. Change in Character emotion (happy to sad, sad to angry, etc.)
  2. Character jumping over a gap
  3. Standing up (from a chair)
  4. Walk Cycle [oldie but goodie!]
  5. Character on a pogo stick (loop)
  6. Laughing
  7. Sneezing
  8. Reaching for an object on a shelf overhead
  9. Quick motion smear/blur
  10. Taking a deep breath [also tougher than it sounds!]
  11. A tree falling
  12. Character being hit by something simple (ball, brick, book)
  13. Run Cycle
Level 3 Exercises
  1. Close up of open hand closing into fist
  2. Close up of hand picking up a small object
  3. Character lifting a heavy object (with purpose!)
  4. Overlapping action (puffy hair, floppy ears, tail)
  5. Character painting
  6. Hammering a nail
  7. Stirring a soup pot and tasting from a spoon
  8. Character blowing up a balloon
  9. Character juggling (loop)
  10. Scared character peering around a corner
  11. Zipping up a jacket
  12. Licking and sealing an envelope
  13. Standing up (from the ground)
  14. Pressing an elevator button and waiting for it
  15. Starting to say something but unsure of how
Level 4 Exercises
  1. Character eating a cupcake
  2. Object falling into a body of water
  3. Two characters playing tug-of-war
  4. Character dealing a deck of cards out
  5. The full process of brushing one’s teeth
  6. A single piece of paper dropping through the air
  7. Run across screen with change in direction
  8. Sleeping character startled by alarm then returning to sleepy state
  9. Opening a cupboard and removing something inside
  10. Putting on a pair of pants
  11. Opening the “world’s best gift” and reacting
  12. Any of the above exercises using a very heavy character/object next to a very light character/object. Enhance the differences the weight change makes!
Things to keep in mind:
  • Reading these exercises will do as much for you as reading about push-ups would do for your physical muscles: NOTHING. If you want the benefit, you must animate them. Take a deep breath and just do it.
  • Do not forget the famous words of Ollie Johnston: “You’re not supposed to animate drawings [3D models]. You’re supposed to animate feelings.” If a character isn’t thinking, they aren’t alive, and the animation has failed.
  • Keep it simple! There is no reason to over complicate any of these exercises. Going back to push-ups, would push-ups be harder if while doing them you also recited the Gettysburg Address? Yes. Would they be any more beneficial? No. Keep things nice and simple and clear.
  • Do your best. There is no reason to do these exercises poorly. Give it your all. You don’t have to show anyone, these are for you. You owe it to yourself to try your very best. Something not quite right? Take the time to fix it.
  • As always, have fun. Push ups are not fun. Animation is supposed to be. Be joyful in your work!

Have any questions about the exercises above? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer them the best we can! Someone else may be wondering the exact same thing, so you’ll help them too. Likewise if someone is looking for possible exercises, why not share a link to these and give them a hand?

Article featured on AnimatorIsland.com 
[Source]
Article composed by J.K. RIKI
MARCH 18, 2013
Follow @AnimatorIsland on Twitter for more updates tips and tricks.

(via undecidedlark)